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Empowering Children and Parents with Tools to Avoid Cyber-Bullying

Posted on March 09, 2012 08:34 PM

Higher Order Concerns

Randolph (2009) wrote that a dissertation literature review, which parallels a primary research process, should provide the formulation of a problem, method for collecting and reporting data, assessment of data, scope of the investigation and its meaning, and formal presentation to the public.  In addition, of Randolph's (2009) sixteen types of literature reviews, rationalizing a problem's significance most closely matches the dissertation's theme, which is empowering grade school children and parents with tools to avoid cyber-bullying.  The section chosen for this literature review is the scope of the investigation and its meaning, which encompasses how bullying affects academic performance, and methods for prevention.  In the investigation about bullying's affect on academic performance, the following four questions are addressed: what is important, why is it important, who needs to know that the subject is important, and how the writing methodology will support the topic's importance.

The Background

According to the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (2008), while bullying affects the academic performance, and the social and emotional development of children, this study's purpose is to focus upon how bullying affects academic performance, and methods for prevention.  Schools can commonly prevent the use of e-tools like cell phones during school hours, but students and parents carry the responsibility of after-school e-tool use.  Although Brown, Jackson, and Cassidy (2006) suggest that schools write policies to prevent cyber-bullying at school and at home, parents hold authority over what happens at home. 

Main Idea: Scope of the Investigation and its Meaning

To rationalize or interpret something from a logical perspective about the importance of empowering grade school children and parents with tools to avoid cyber-bullying includes answers to the following questions: what is important, why is it important, who needs to know that the subject is important, and how will the writing methodology support the topic's importance?  The importance of the literature review is to empower grade school children and parents with tools to avoid cyber-bullying.  Why this topic is important is because cyber bullying causes a high degree of emotional strain on children, which negatively affects academic performance.  Those who need to know that the topic is important includes everyone who has a role in a child's education including those who are bullying.  The writing methodology supports the topic's importance by presenting relevant reviews of current research that will provide

(1) proof that the emotional strain caused by cyber bullying diminishes students' abilities to perform well academically, (2) an analysis of how cyber bullying is carried out via available technologies, and (3) recommendations for empowering students and parents to eliminate cyber- bullying.   

Summarizing the main idea based upon the aforementioned comments above results in the following statement:

            As grade school students' academic performance continues to be affected by

            cyber-bullying, effective methods to block out cyber-bullying, which can

            empower parents, students, and teachers, have not been forthcoming. 

            Examining current research relative to cyber-bullying provides insight

            into why cyber-bullying has increased, and how e-tools are used to

            transmit harrassing messages.  Recommendations on how to eliminate

            cyber-bullying are provided.   

 References

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. (2008, May). Bullying: Facts for  families (No. 80). Retrieved January 17, 2010, from http://www.aacap.org/galleries/FactsForFamilies/80_bullying.pdf

Brown, K., Jackson, M., & Cassidy, W. (2006). Cyber-bullying: Developing policy to direct responses that are equitable and effective in addressing this special form of bullying. Canadian Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, (57), p. 1.  Retrieved  January 23, 2010, from ERIC.

Randolph, J.J. (2009, June). A guide to writing the dissertation literature review. Practical  Assessment, Research and Evaluation, (14)13, p. 1. Retrieved January 23, 2011, from http://pareonline.net/pdf/v14n13.pdf

 

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